Standing at the rear of this small, urban church Opus 74 is a one manual and pedal organ designed to sound vigorous, youthful, pungent, and above all, happy. While it does not have the resources of a larger organ, Opus 74 nevertheless has the versatility necessary for the Episcopal liturgy and for recitals or concerts. Several of the stops are divided between tenor B and middle C giving the organist the option to play on some stops as a melody with one hand while the other hand plays on others as an accompaniment. A “machine stop” pedal was included to make quick changes in volume. This device and the divided stops imitate the effect of a two-manual organ. In addition a “double draw” stop brings on the Nazard when pulled out half way and when fully drawn adds a second rank to create the Sesquialtera.

The case of red oak with mahogany trim befits the simplicity of the church and bears a resemblance to the central section of Opus 45 in Westerly, Rhode Island. With the upward curving top panels providing a visual contrast to the arched window behind the organ, the tall wooden pedal Subbass at the back embraces the window and makes it and the organ one. The Cymbelstern (cymbal star) in the center of the façade is designed following the 16th and 17th century cymbelsterns found on European organs. It is the first wind driven cymbelstern to appear on a Fisk organ.